Little Bounds Mine, Cornwall

Little Bounds Mine Cornwall

Little Bounds Mine became a part of St Just United which incorporated numerous smaller mines now all the water from these mines rises up through this hole.

At Little Bounds "at some former period, through the avarice or carelessness of the workmen, a communication was made in two parts of the lode ... between the sea and the mine: one of them is about high water mark at spring tides; the other is covered by the sea at every tide, except at very low neaps: great and constant attention is therefore paid to the latter, which was at first stopped by a piece of wood covered with turf; but as this was found not to be perfectly secure, a thick platform, caulked like the deck of a ship, is now placed on it, which renders it almost water proof."

1820 Little Bounds mine was visited by John Forbes when it was 64 fathoms deep but had been abandoned below the 40 fathom level for some time. Pumping was carried out by a waterwheel. An adit had also been driven 400 fathoms in land to Wheal Bellan, on Bollowall Common. Other mines operating at this time and subsequently incorporated within the sett were Wheal Buck (possibly an alternative name for Wheal Bellan), Wheal Dower and Wheal Whidden.

1821 Joseph Carne, writing for the Royal Geological Society of Cornwall in 1821 said of Little Bounds Tin Mine. Here three distinct lodes, distant from each other, have been wrought under the sea; two of them are in granite; the other is in slate. Here also, at some former period, through the avarice or carelessness of the workmen, a communication was made in two parts of the lode known by the name of Saveall's lode, between the sea and the mine: one of them is about high water mark at spring tides; the other is covered by the sea at every tide, except at very low neaps. great and constant attention is therefore paid to the latter, which was at first stopped by a piece of Wood covered with turf, but as this was found not to be perfectly secure, a thick platform caulked like the deck of a ship, is now placed on it, which renders it almost water proof On Little Bounds lode, the 20 fathoms level below the adit is driven 40 fathoms horizontally under the sea: the other levels to the depth of 64 fathoms are driven various lengths, from 30 to 60 fathoms. On the north lode the 40 fathoms level is driven 40 fathoms, and on Saveall's lode (in slate) the levels are extended from 1 0 to 40 fathoms under the sea. The breaking of the waves is heard in all the levels; but as a part of this mine is under a pebbly beach, the rolling of the large pebbles, in boisterous weather, causes a more terrifying noise, and a greater concussion, than are produced by the mere dashing of the waves against the rocks. The water is all brackish, and, of course, injures the pumps. It is drawn by a water engine which is erected on the very extremity of the cliff. The situation of this mine, although not quite so romantic as that of Botallack, is yet well deserving of attention. Mr. Lysons considered it worthy of an engraving in his Magna Britannia. Small quantities of tin ore are frequently thrown up by the sea, on the beach below the Little Bounds engine. One or more workmen may generally be seen, on the return of the tide after high water, searching for tin amongst the sand and shingle. It is probable that this comes from the back of some of the tin-lodes which run under the sea.

1830's Little Bounds Mine expanded was operating as Bollowall Mine in the 1830s.

1840s the operations around Bollowall Common had amalgamated to form Bollowall and Nanpean Mines, although this appears to have ceased by the late 1850s. A small steam pumping engine (15 inch cylinder) was in use, the house probably being near the cliff edge above the adit.

1861 the leases were taken up by the St Just United Tin and Copper Mining Company, the first limited liability company to work in Cornwall. The managing agent was John Carthew, then in his early 70s, who had worked in many of the St Just mines as well as in Bolivia.

St. Just United Mine which worked the area until January 1889. The Saveall's lode of Little Bounds is visible in Priests cove as it runs along the granite killas junction.

St Just Area Mines, Cornwall